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Yap, a speech recognition technology provider, announced on Monday a deal with MetroPCS to power its Spanish language Voice Mail to Text service. The service will allow Spanish MetroPCS customers to read transcribed versions of Spanish voicemails. This add-on feature is an expansion of MetroPCS’ existing Voice Mail to Text service for English customers that was launched last year. The feature should increase MetroPCS’ revenue from the Spanish-speaking market, especially in high concentration areas such as California and Texas.

Marcello Typin, vice president of products at Yap, commented on the new feature:

“Spanish language support is a natural evolution for Yap. There is a tremendous market opportunity for transcribing Spanish voicemails into text, and Yap’s platform provides the necessary high accuracy and fast turn-around time.”
The Yap technology automatically identifies the language being spoken and transcribes it in the correct language. These transcriptions allow service users to receive information more quickly and in more restricted settings than traditional voicemails.

The Expanding Market

The US Census Bureau has released statistics from the 2010 Census showing that the Hispanic population increased by 15.2 million, which accounts for over half of the total US population increase. The Hispanic population also grew by 43 percent, which is 4 times the national average. That makes Hispanics the fastest growing minority group. With the explosive growth of this market, pressure is building for businesses to tailor offerings towards them.

Rachel Ramsey, a TMCnet Editorial Assistant, commented on the clout of the Spanish-speaking market:

In related news, according to a white paper titled “Service, Por Favor: Ten Reasons to Better Serve and Woo the Booming Hispanic Market,” the Hispanic market segment boasts some $580 billion in spending power, which at the time was expected to nearly double to $925 billion by 2007. This means to businesses that they must pay more time and attention to your Spanish language contact center solution options.”
For many companies the full extent of their multilingual capabilities is in the language options of their IVR systems. How many contact centers have agents who are able to deal with customers speaking other languages? How many contact centers could benefit from an enhanced customer relationship through better communication?The demographics of the country are changing–will contact center be able to change with it?

Will Yap’s Spanish language technology lead to long term benefits? How can other call center software makers address the needs of a multicultural market? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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